Disease Duration, Flare-ups Affect Mental Health of Non-CF Bronchiectasis Patients, Study Finds

Disease Duration, Flare-ups Affect Mental Health of Non-CF Bronchiectasis Patients, Study Finds
People with non-cystic fibrosis (CF) bronchiectasis are at an increased risk for anxiety and depression, and this risk is associated with a higher rate of exacerbations (when symptoms suddenly worsen) and shorter disease duration (time since diagnosis), according to a Turkish study. The study, which analyzed self-reported data and disease severity indices, was published in an article, “Clinical impact of depression and anxiety in patients with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis,” in the journal Tuberculosis and Thorax.  According to the World Health Organization, the worldwide prevalence of depression and anxiety is about 4%. Psychosocial factors in people with chronic respiratory symptoms may contribute to their worsened health status. The link between worse outcomes in non-CF bronchiectasis and having anxiety and depression has been reported, but existing evidence to support this is still unclear. Therefore, a team from Turkey set out to detect depression and anxiety in patients with stable non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis and to evaluate its relationship with disease severity. None of the 90 participants (median age 45 years; 53 women and 37 men) had had an exacerbation for at least four weeks, as defined by deterioration in symptoms such as cough, sputum volume and/or consistency, breathlessness, exercise tolerance, and fatigue. Patients were asked to complete the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS), which includes 14 questions. Those with a score of 10 or higher were considered to have anxiety, while a score of 7 or greater meant they experienced depression. Results showed that 41% experienced depression and 30% showed anxiety. These findings are consistent with previous research that found anxiety and depression common in bronch
Subscribe or log in to read the rest of this content.