Should Bronchiectasis Patients Exercise?

There have been many studies on the benefits of exercise for bronchiectasis patients and they all conclude that exercise should be an essential part of treatment for anyone suffering from this chronic lung condition.

Six tips for managing bronchiectasis

Clinical trials have found that participants who exercise twice weekly experience both short- and long-term benefits. Patients who exercised regularly had less frequent exacerbations, could walk further in the six-minute walking test, and were less short of breath. Find out more about studies of the effects of exercise for bronchiectasis patients here. 

It’s thought that pulmonary rehabilitation consisting of regular exercise can improve the quality of life for those suffering from bronchiectasis in the same way it does for other chronic lung disease patients.

Seven reasons why pulmonary rehabilitation is important

Bronchiectasis News Today is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or another qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.

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Wendy is a proven blogger and social media manager who has helped to build online communities for businesses and organizations. She currently heads the website’s social outreach online through social media platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

11 comments

  1. Betsy Martin says:

    I’m 64 and I was diagnosed with bronchiectasis and MAC lung disease a year ago. I made the decision not to take the regimen of antibiotics normally prescribed for MAC, because of the debilitating side effects. I do Crossfit a minimum of five days a week and spin class twice a week. I always feel better after I exercise….and it is strenuous. I can’t stress enough the importance of movement.
    Feeling blessed.

  2. Nila Atkins says:

    I am 53 years old and was diagnosed with non cystic Bronchiectasis at the age of 25. I had to have a lobe removed on my left side. while my right lung and lobes are still in tact. But, I have been experiencing more tightness and phlegm production. I take a daily regiment of nebulizers and use the vest up to 3x a day. And use cipro to combat several infections. I also carry the psuedomonas bacteria. I have gained so much weight due to being so fatigued and a unhealthy diet. My activity levels have not been that good. I am needing to lose a great deal of excessive weight which I know has affected my breathing and ability to exercise. I have been given the Ok by my doctor to exercise. So I am trying out some light yoga to improve my strength and muscle tone. I am wondering does anyone have some ideas on any other exercises that will reduce a tummy quickly without causing issue with my breathing? I would really appreciate any help or advice Thanks

    • Dawnsunny says:

      Hi there.
      I stopped eating carbs and sugar and lost 3 stone in about 4 months! (Plus I only drank water) I had to do it i was so scared when I got the diagnosis, so that helped me stay on track.
      I pray you are successful xx

  3. Terri O'neill says:

    I am 72 years old and have been diagnosed with MAC lung. I had TB as a child and my lungs have been damaged due to this. I have declined the antibiotics treatment to see if my body can control the disease. I have started walking and doing weight-bearing exercises. Will this help to somewhat control the disease?

    • Angie Clark says:

      That’s interesting, I too need to lose weight, I have bronchiectasis, psuedomonos. I had TB in 2014 and the drugs and everything were just awful. I did have a A typical bacterium lurking but on recent bronchoscopy and sputum samples there appears to be no sign of it now, Doctor was just about to embark me on an 18 month antibiotic concoction!!! thank goodness!! I have 3 vertibrae fractures in my spine and my stomach is distended as a result which makes breathing and bringing up phlemg difficult. I feel if I lose some weight things will be easier for me I’ not obese by any means, I’ 5’6″ and 11 stone which is my heaviest, possibly due to retirement and inactivity. I also do a lot of sewing at the sewing machine.

  4. I have bronchiectasis and have not taken antibiotics for about 5 years. I make my own special herbal tea and inhale an unusual natural herbal oil. Exercise, balanced diet and healthy living are all part of my regime.
    I am so pleased with my results that I am in the final stages of writing a book about my experiences.
    It is great to read about so many people following their own path to thwart this horrible condition.

  5. Steve says:

    I’m about to turn 66. I was diagnosed with bronchiectasis in 2011, and started the thrice-weekly azithromycin. I was a runner at the time, and although I suspected strenuous running in Texas heat may have caused the bronchiectasis, I continued running. About a year ago, my breathing tests improved and I felt better, so I discontinued the antibiotics. Up until 2 weeks ago, I was doing well, running more than ever. Then I did a half-marathon, overheated, and got sick. Now I may need to get back on the antibiotics. All to say: Good, regular aerobic exercise seemed to help me, but not if I overdo it! Interested in reading the book, Andrew.

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