Risk Factors For Bronchiectasis Identified in COPD Patients

Risk Factors For Bronchiectasis Identified in COPD Patients
A research team recently reported three parameters – male gender, a history of tuberculosis and increased levels of serum T-IgE – as independent risks factors for the coexistence of bronchiectasis in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The study “Factors associated with bronchiectasis in patients with moderate–severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease,” was published in the journal Medicine. Several studies had already reported an association between bronchiectasis and more severe symptoms, higher frequency of exacerbations, and mortality; which led the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung disease (GOLD) to declare bronchiectasis as one of the comorbidities of COPD. Supporting information came from high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT), increasingly used in the assessment of COPD, that detected more frequent cases of bronchiectasis in COPD patients. While risk factors for bronchiectasis in COPD patients had been poorly characterized, researchers for the recent study aimed to determine risk factors for bronchiectasis in a well-defined cohort of patients with stable moderate to severe COPD. Patients underwent HRCT and two radiologists evaluated the results for the presence and extent of bronchiectasis. Researchers also evaluated other parameters in the two groups of patients with and without bronchiectasis: demographic data, respiratory symptoms, lung function, previous pulmonary tuberculosis, serum
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