Preclinical Data Supports Development of Inhaled Form of Murepavadin to Fight P. Aeruginosa Infections

Preclinical Data Supports Development of Inhaled Form of Murepavadin to Fight P. Aeruginosa Infections
A new experimental antibiotic named murepavadin is both safe and effective at fighting bacterial lung infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa when given via inhalation, a study in mice shows. These findings were discussed earlier this month at the 42nd European Cystic Fibrosis Conference in Liverpool, England, in a presentation titled, "Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of murepavadin (POL7080) in neutropenic lung infection models when evaluated by aerosol administration." Murepavadin, also known as POL7080, is being developed by the pharmaceutical company Polyphor. It belongs to a new class of antibiotics called Outer Membrane Protein Targeting Antibiotics (OMPTA) that are believed to effectively fight bacteria that are resistant to other antibiotics. "Respiratory infections, especially those caused by drug-resistant bacteria, are the main cause of disease and death in people with cystic fibrosis and bronchiectasis. New treatment options are urgently needed to fight resistant pathogens, especially resistant Pseudomonas strains," Daniel Obrecht, PhD, chief science officer of Polyphor, said in a press release. "Murepavadin is a precision antibiotic specifically targeting Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the main cause of chronic lung infection in cystic fibrosis [and bronchiectasis]." In the most recent preclinical studies, researchers infected mice with P. aeruginosa, and then treated them with murepavadin at doses ranging from 0.156 to 15 mg/kg. The antibiotic was administered intratracheally, meaning it was pumped directly into the trachea (windpipe). This administration route is more invasive than simple inhalation, but it allows more precise control over dosing. The research team was particularly interested in understanding the stability and dynamics
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