Brensocatib Significantly Lowers Flare Risk in Non-CF Bronchiectasis, Trial Shows

Brensocatib Significantly Lowers Flare Risk in Non-CF Bronchiectasis, Trial Shows
Treatment with brensocatib significantly and safely extended the time to a first exacerbation and lowered flare rates in people with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis (NCFBE), results from a Phase 2 trial show. These benefits were observed across all subgroups in the WILLOW trial (NCT03218917). Findings also showed a trend toward a lesser decline in lung function among patients given brensocatib across this 24-week study, its researchers said. The treatment's use, however, did not lead to reported improvements in quality of life measures, and caused significantly more adverse events (excepting exacerbations) than a placebo. Trial results were recently published in the New England Journal of Medicine, in the study "Phase 2 Trial of the DPP-1 Inhibitor Brensocatib in Bronchiectasis." They were also shared at the virtual European Respiratory Society (ERS) International Congress 2020. Brensocatib, initially developed by AstraZeneca and then licensed to Insmed in 2016, is an oral small molecule designed to lead to fewer exacerbations in bronchiectasis patients. With this disease, inflammation is driven mainly by neutrophils, a kind of immune cell that, when activated, releases enzymes which eventually damage the lungs. Brensocatib blocks a molecule key to that activation, the dipeptidyl peptidase 1 (DPP1) protein. The WILLOW trial investigated whether brensocatib could prevent flares and lung function decline in 256 adults with NCFBE. Enrolled across 14 countries, patients had had at least two exacerbations in the previous year, and were randomly assigned to a 10 mg or a 25 mg dose of brensocatib, or a placebo, once daily for 24 weeks (nearly six months). Overall, more 90% of patients adhered to their assigned oral regimen, and over 80% completed th
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